The Best Macaroons For This Spring

Olive Oil Macaroons
Olive Oil Macaroons
March 12, 2015
Lemon-Rosemary-Olive-Oil-Pound-Cake-5
Baking with EVOO – Tips Tricks, & More
March 12, 2015
Olive Oil Macaroons
The Best Macaroons For This Spring

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We are so happy to invite Jessie Oleson Moore from CakeSpy once again to create a fun way to bake with us using our Colavita Extra Virgin Olive Oil. Jessie has her own blog where she writes and illustrates her baking recipes and has developed two dessert cookbooks Sweet Treats for a Sugar Filled Life and The Secret Lives of Baked Goods. This time, she will be talking about baking delicious coconut macaroons with olive oil and how they relate to the traditions of Passover. Read on to see what Jessie has to say!

It wouldn’t be Passover without macaroons. Actually, there’s an interesting reason why, and it has to do with flour, or the lack thereof. According to the New York Times, “The only thing a macaroon can’t be, so far as Passover is concerned, is made with leavened flour, which is forbidden during the holiday, as are other grains. This symbolizes the fact that when the Jews fled bondage in Egypt, the bread they were baking did not have time to rise, and it is why many Jews substitute matzoh for bread during Passover…”

While the lack of leavened flour might account for the coconut macaroon’s place at Passover, there’s no doubt that they endure because, well, they’re delicious little cookies.

And here’s a little secret: they’re even better when you add some olive oil.

Many traditional recipes for macaroons don’t call for any added fat such as butter or oil, so adding olive oil to the mix was a bit tricky: it took five batches of macaroons with various ratios of olive oil and egg whites, to get the mixture just right. But it was worth the trouble, because the finished macaroons with olive oil are really something special: simultaneously airy and rich, coconutty and sweet, with the olive oil imparting a slightly nutty and vaguely lemon-like flavor that lingers on the tongue.

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The key to success, it turned out, was cooking the mixture before baking; while it might seem like an odd step, it will help you reduce the added moisture that the olive oil brings to the mix, so that you can retain all of the flavor, but maintain a firm, haystack-like shape in your finished macaroons.

Because chocolate makes everything better, these macaroons are finished with a drizzling of rich Perugina 51% cacao chocolate on top. This final touch really makes them sparkle, and gives them a very pretty finish.

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Want to make these macaroons? Find the recipe here. Let us know in the comments what you think!